Thursday, June 30th, 2016

The month ended with a strengthening south-westerly airflow and a mix of sunshine, cloud and downpours as fronts moved through the area. The season’s first Ruff dropped in at East Lea this morning, where dragonflies included an ovipositing Black-tailed Skimmer and several Broad-bodied and Four-spotted Chasers.

Ruff, East Lea (Mark Pearson)

Ruff, East Lea (Mark Pearson)

Yesterday saw 12 Curlews heading south over North Cliff, where c280 Swifts were feeding along a storm front.

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Normal service resumes with an unremarkable period to report on over the last ten days or so, the highlight being two Spoonbills briefly at the Dams on 25th. Otherwise, 20 Common Scoter and 11 Curlew headed north at the Gap on 26th, and a count of orchid spikes on the Tip on 19th produced impressive totals of 1000+ Common Spotted, 150+ Pyramidal and seven Bee.

Friday, June 17th, 2016

Nothing of note to report over the last few days, and there’ll be a short break in transmissions here on the latest sightings page, with normal service resuming towards the end of the month. In the event of a rarity however, info will be be posted here as usual.

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Little to report locally over recent days as migration grinds to a temporary halt, although as is to be expected there’s still a trickle of waders on the move – these have included two Curlews at the Dams today and two Black-tailed Godwits at East Lea on 12th. A singing Grasshopper Warbler at Reighton (NC) is only the second of the year of a generally uncommon bird at Filey in recent years.

Curlew (Ian Robinson)

Curlew (Ian Robinson)

In other news, the Spanish Wagtail which visited East Lea on 22nd April last year has just been accepted as a first for Britain by the British Birds Rarities Committee, and becomes the third bird from Filey to do so (following Spectacled Warbler and Siberian Pied Flycatcher in the 1990’s).

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Very little of note to report over recent days, with a stready arrival of Painted Ladies providing most of the migration interest – all days have seen small numbers, with a peak of 25 on 7th. Diamond-back moths have also continued to arrive to large numbers, with several thousand anecdotally observed each day (representing a very small fraction of actual numbers).

Last week's Avocet (Mark Pearson)

Last week’s Avocet (Mark Pearson)

Avian arrivals have been conspicuous by their absence, although we did receive news of last week’s colour-ringed Avocet from the BTO today: it was ringed as a chick at Seal Sands, Teesmouth on 2nd June 2015, and this is the first sighting since.

Last week's Avocet (Mark Pearson)

Last week’s Avocet (Mark Pearson)

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Avocet (Mark Pearson)

Avocet (Mark Pearson)

A clear and sunny day with an initially light but strengthening south-easterly saw an Avocet at the Dams (HJW et al.) for the duration; otherwise, 15 Painted Ladies were in the Carr Naze / Country Park area, single Knot, Whimbrel and Redshank were on the Brigg and two Manxies headed south this afternoon. Thousands of diamond-back moths are present in the northern coastal area, with many on Carr Naze suggesting a continuing arrival.

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

Painted Lady (Ian Robinson)

Painted Lady (Ian Robinson)

A very slow few days for avian migrants perhaps, but it’s been far from it regarding the extraordinary invasion of Diamond-back moths. Countless thousands are and have been present in the recording area, with a sample dedicated transect of a (very small) section of the northern coastal area resulting in a minimum count of 14,140 on 4th. Painted Ladies have also begun to arrive, with several yesterday and at least 12 today.

Black-tailed Godwits at East Lea last week (Tony Collinson)

Black-tailed Godwits at East Lea last week (Tony Collinson)

A Hobby was over the Country Park on 4th, a blue Fulmar north on 3rd has been the best of a very quiet sea, with a belated report of two Long-tailed Ducks off the Brigg on 2nd.

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

A very quiet few days dominated by strong northerly winds, some heavy precipitation and particularly poor conditions generally. New migrants have been few and far between as a result, with a trickle of northbound waders peaking with 24 Sanderlings on the Brigg on 30th.

Diamond-back moth (Mark Pearson)

Diamond-back moth (Mark Pearson)

Non-avian migrants have staged a huge influx however, in the tiny shape of Diamond-back moths – a very incomplete count of a fraction of the recording area yesterday (the centre of town, Carr Naze and a couple of gardens) resulted in a total of at least 790, a new Filey record by a very long way.