Thursday, January 28th, 2016

A relatively quiet week in the area, although a Tundra Bean Goose in off this morning (MJP) was new for the year and the Surf Scoter remains faithful to the north of the bay / south side of the Brigg. At least one Great Northern Diver is in the same area, and high tide counts at dawn this morning also produced 63 Purple Sandpipers, 49 Shags and 35 Cormorants leaving roost sites.

Purple Sandpiper (Dan Lombard) – find out about the ringing team’s recent success with this species via the Ringing tab in the main menu

The pick of the last few days has involved 300 Curlews (an exception count) in the north-western corner of the recording area off Gristhorpe Cliff, 155 Pink-feet north on 25th (with presumably the same birds west over the town soon after), Blue Fulmars south on 24th & 22nd, and a 2cy Little Gull south on 23rd.

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

Notable records from the last few days are again headed up by our (very) long-staying American friend in the north of the bay – the young male Surf Scoter clocking up a remarkable 38 days as of this morning. Single Blue Fulmars passed the Brigg on 18th, 19th & 20th, with a Black-throated Diver past on 18th (JS). Up to three Great Northern Divers remain in the bay, and several Woodcock records have included birds in off the sea and also on the Brigg. A Little Gull was reported from the Dams yesterday, while the deceased White-beaked Dolphin was confirmed as a young female.

Glaucous Gull & White-beaked Dolphin, 16th (Mark Pearson)

Glaucous Gull & White-beaked Dolphin, 16th (Mark Pearson)

The ringing team have been busy both day and night of late, with some fascinating results – see here for more details….

 

Sunday, January 17th, 2016

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An interesting few days, again dominated by the sea and shore. Our first notable cetacean sighting of the year sadly involved a deceased White-beaked Dolphin which was washed ashore in the bay corner yesterday (16th), presumably a youngster based on a length of c180 cm (MJP et al); more positively, it attracted a juvenile Glaucous Gull today (TI, MJP, DA et al), which, despite much disturbance, returned to feed on several occasions.

Surf Scoter (Dave Aitken)

Surf Scoter (Dave Aitken)

A Grey Phalarope flew north on 13th (JS), while three Little Auks went south in a northerly gale on 15th (MJP) and a single was off Hunmanby Gap on 16th (WS). After a day off yesterday, our long-staying Surf Scoter returned this morning, while Great Northern Divers are particularly prevalent of late, often close inshore along the southern flank of the Brigg, with up to four both yesterday and today. Little Gulls have been noted in ones and twos on several dates, argentatus Herring Gulls have trickled north (with a peak of 10 on 14th), a Mediterranean Gull went north on 15th, and 50 Pink-footed Geese went south yesterday (with a flock south over the town after dark on the evening of 15th).

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Glaucous Gull feeding on White-beaked Dolphin (Mark Pearson)

Glaucous Gull feeding on White-beaked Dolphin (Mark Pearson)

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

All notable records continue to come from the Brigg and bay, where the star of the show remains the long-staying immature drake Surf Scoter – usually found in the area of the bay between the Carr Naze steps and the seawatch hide, it was accompanied by an adult male Common Scoter for much of today. Otherwise, Little Gulls have been an almost constant presence, although usually only in ones and twos, with the exception of at least 40 scattered along the bay on 10th. Single Great Northern Divers have been present off the Brigg and the Gap, where two Black-throated Divers were reported on 11th (WS) – the first in the recording area since November last year.

Common Buzzard (John Harwood)

Common Buzzard (John Harwood)

Small numbers of wildfowl on the move have included 12 dark-bellied Brents north on 9th, while two particularly pale Common Buzzards are currently in the area (one near Reighton Gap and one towards Gristhorpe Bay).

Friday, January 8th, 2016

Little Gull this afternoon (Mark Pearson)

Little Gull this afternoon (Mark Pearson)

All notable reports have come from the Brigg and bay over recent days, where Little Gulls numbered an impressive 77 late today (35 feeding, 42 south) and single figures have been noted most other days. The immature male Surf Scoter is still in the bay (and is moulting into a more distinctive plumage), at least one Great Northern Diver is in the general area, Blue Fulmars passed by on 6th (two) and 7th, with a single Little Auk also on the former date.

Little Gulls heading south this afternoon (Mark Pearson)

Little Gulls heading south this afternoon (Mark Pearson)

Other records include odd pale- and dark-bellied Brent Geese and Woodcocks, while the high tide roost on the Brigg held 41 Purple Sandpipers, nine Ringed Plovers, 12 Dunlin and two Curlews this afternoon.

Sunday, January 3rd, 2016

Happy New Year from FBOG, and welcome to this year’s sightings updates! As usual, I’ll be updating these pages every few days in quieter periods, and every day / other day during migration seasons. If you’ve taken photographs of local birds and wildlife and would like them considering for the sightings updates, please email them to me (as soon as possible after they were taken) at mpearson(at)fbog.co.uk, replacing the (at) with @.

Little Gull (Mark Pearson)

Little Gull (Mark Pearson)

Brisk, often strong south-easterlies and heavy storms are stirring up the sea and its occupants of late, with notable records including Little Auks today (MJP) and yesterday (three, JS), Blue Fulmars today (MJP) and yesterday (four, JS), Little Gulls (at least six today and two yesterday), two Pintails among various wildfowl on the move today, and odd Bonxies heading south. Our long-staying and new year list-adorning Surf Scoter is still in situ, as is at least one Great Northern Diver, and moderate numbers of auks and Red-throated Divers.

Surf Scoter (Tony Dixon)

Surf Scoter (Tony Dixon)

Surf Scoter (John Harwood)

Surf Scoter (John Harwood)

A male Stonechat was on Carr Naze today, with other records of note likely following later as a result of today’s Bird race activities. A sting in the tail of 2015, meanwhile, was provided by a Richard’s Pipit (TJD et al.) on the Tip on 29th Dec.

Richard's Pipit, 29th Dec (John Harwood)

Richard’s Pipit, 29th Dec (John Harwood)